Women are sharing their comebacks to instances of everyday sexism

veganpoopxvx:

dingdongno:

and it’s amazing

image

but wait there’s moreimage

omg and then image

from (x)

Yes

(via vandyventures)

Tags: sexism

Obviously, not the only reason to choose a college, but the schools listed are awesome anyways. 

Tags: colleges

bookgeekconfessions:

I wanted to double check that “The Cherry on Top” was a short novel or novella and I found this on uphillwriting.org. I think it’s very informative and hopefully you guys will find it useful!

(Source: uphillwriting.org, via freezingmybrainsoff)

Tags: books


College Abacus helps families decipher confusing financial letters by using the federal Shopping Sheet.

College Abacus helps families decipher confusing financial letters by using the federal Shopping Sheet.

yaleadmissions:

Seen above: The masters and deans of each of the residential colleges proudly represent their colleges on stage during a freshman welcome address.
Every residential college has a master and a dean. The master and dean are professors who live in the college with their families, eat meals with students in the dining hall, and serve as the college’s leaders. Masters and deans are an integral part of the residential college experience and are resources, mentors, and advisors for the students in their college.

Seen above: Master Jonathan Holloway—newly appointed Dean of Yale College—at a Calhoun College cookout.
The master is tasked with fostering social, cultural, and educational experiences within the college, and ultimately helping to define the character of the residential college. The master will arrange and host a variety of college events—such as forums, study breaks (especially during finals period), and Master’s Teas with renowned guests. (More on Master’s Teas to come in an upcoming post!)

Seen above: Morse College Dean Joel Silverman meets with a student in his office.
The dean is an academic and personal advisor to students in the college. The residential college dean’s office handles course schedules and other day-to-day administration for students. Beyond that, however, the college dean serves as an advisor to students who may be struggling socially or academically, and connects them with appropriate resources.

Seen above: Students cheer on as Master G (Pierson Master Harvey Goldblatt) digs in to wrestle with Dean Fabbri (Pierson Dean Amerigo Fabbri) in one of Pierson College’s most anticipated annual traditions—Yellow Jell-O Wrestling!
Masters and deans get to know their students well. Together, the master and the dean oversee not only the day-to-day operations of the colleges, but also the four-year growth of each of the students in their residential college communities. 
Check out Tobias’ blog post on his residential college Master and Dean here: http://bit.ly/Tpho1X

yaleadmissions:

Seen above: The masters and deans of each of the residential colleges proudly represent their colleges on stage during a freshman welcome address.

Every residential college has a master and a dean. The master and dean are professors who live in the college with their families, eat meals with students in the dining hall, and serve as the college’s leaders. Masters and deans are an integral part of the residential college experience and are resources, mentors, and advisors for the students in their college.

image

Seen above: Master Jonathan Holloway—newly appointed Dean of Yale College—at a Calhoun College cookout.

The master is tasked with fostering social, cultural, and educational experiences within the college, and ultimately helping to define the character of the residential college. The master will arrange and host a variety of college events—such as forums, study breaks (especially during finals period), and Master’s Teas with renowned guests. (More on Master’s Teas to come in an upcoming post!)

image

Seen above: Morse College Dean Joel Silverman meets with a student in his office.

The dean is an academic and personal advisor to students in the college. The residential college dean’s office handles course schedules and other day-to-day administration for students. Beyond that, however, the college dean serves as an advisor to students who may be struggling socially or academically, and connects them with appropriate resources.

image

Seen above: Students cheer on as Master G (Pierson Master Harvey Goldblatt) digs in to wrestle with Dean Fabbri (Pierson Dean Amerigo Fabbri) in one of Pierson College’s most anticipated annual traditions—Yellow Jell-O Wrestling!

Masters and deans get to know their students well. Together, the master and the dean oversee not only the day-to-day operations of the colleges, but also the four-year growth of each of the students in their residential college communities. 

Check out Tobias’ blog post on his residential college Master and Dean here: http://bit.ly/Tpho1X

(via )

Tags: yale

Matches: More complex than you’d think

collegeapp-chick:

Match schools are the meat and potatoes of your college list. They’re the foundation, they’re the focus, and they’re, quite simply, the most important.

I’d argue that there are three types of match school.

The True Match-

A true match is a school that you have a good chance of getting into. You’d say you’re more likely than not going to get in. You like the school, you’re pretty sure you can afford it, and you’d definitely consider going if accepted.

This is the wonderful shining star of a school. This school is your best friend. You should have more of this type of school than any other type of school.

This is what you should star your college search with, because this is the most important school on your list.

The Low Match-

Not quite a safety, but not a true match either. This school is somewhere in between.

A low match is a great school. You’re pretty positive you’ll get in. Something about it keeps it from being a true, real, 100% safety school, but it’s pretty darn close.

Often a low match is classified as such because you’re on the high end of the middle 50%, but not outside of it. Or perhaps you’re not certain you can afford it.

But, again, a low match needs to be a school you’d be happy to attend. If you wouldn’t want to go, why would you waste the time and money to apply?

The High Match-

In my perfect world, there would be no reaches, there would only be high matches.
This is a school you’re qualified for. Super qualified for. But it’s a bit trickier to nail down as a school you’re “confident” about. You know you have a real shot, you’re just not sure about it.
And that’s okay.
A high match is a school that you’d like to attend, but you know your chances aren’t the best. You might need a ton of money, or you might just slip through the cracks.

This is different than a reach or a lottery school (more on that tomorrow). 

All matches aren’t created equal. A student who has too many high matches often ends up at their safety because they didn’t evaluate fairly. Figure out where you stand, and adjust accordingly.

A great list is full of options you can actually get into and actually want to attend.

Tags: colleges

gallifreyanlanterns:

vexie-chan:

midnitedancer:

sdelabelle:

cute-sexual:

thelittlecoyoteinitiative:

This needs to be rebloggable …

number 9 tho

number fucking 9. there was a dude that would play his guitar outside of my window at 1 am all the time

Some bits that I’ve picked up:
There’s a general rule of college that if you were sitting in that seat for over two weeks, that is your seat. Not many if any professors have seating arrangements but switching seats will fuck everyone up.
Get there early and stay late. As soon as you get home you will not want to do shit. Stay on campus and do some homework while you’re in the environment.
SIT UP FRONT. The best way to start understanding something is to listen to someone talk about it and you can’t do that from the back of the class trying to listen over everyone whispering to each other. LISTENING WILL MAKE HOMEWORK SO MUCH EASIER. 
Be childish, but be respectful. Have a massive snowball fight across campus, but don’t aim for anyone not taking part. 
SHUT THE FUCK UP IN THE LIBRARY. Some people work there, some people sleep there. It is a quiet space. 
Don’t be afraid to talk to professors. They are not there to flunk you. They would rather you pass than not.
IF YOU NEED TUTORING GET TUTORING DON’T WAIT UNTIL YOU’VE DUG YOURSELF INTO YOUR GRAVE.
Get involved. It will help you make friends, give you new skills to learn, and even help you get a leg up in the work place if you know the right people.

I will add to this as a GTA:
   Take time for yourself—buy a planner, figure out when your best study hours are, figure out WHERE you study best, and figure out how much time you need to complete an assignment—AND THEN make sure to pencil in an hour for video games, some time to watch a TV show, or time to just lay on your floor and blow bubbles. Whatever you like. Don’t forget about YOU.
  SLEEP. EAT. DRINK WATER. Don’t die. Caffeine =/= sleep. I cannot emphasize that this much. 
    AND MOST IMPORTANTLY:
  COMMUNICATE WITH YOUR INSTRUCTORS! If you’re sick, shoot an e-mail and say “Hey, I’m sick today. Can I set up a time to talk to you about what I missed?” If you’ve got a good opportunity (scholarships, to go to another country, to check out a cool lecture, etc.) let your prof know ahead of time. If you just need time to work on projects, all it takes is an e-mail. We understand. I gave a student a free skip day because he e-mailed me and said “Hey, look, I have two massive tests and a project due and I need the time to study.” And THAT IS OKAY.
   However, sometimes you just need a personal day, and you know what, when you wake up and getting out of bed seems like the worst idea ever….just turn off your alarm and get that sleep.

thank you ^

gallifreyanlanterns:

vexie-chan:

midnitedancer:

sdelabelle:

cute-sexual:

thelittlecoyoteinitiative:

This needs to be rebloggable …

number 9 tho

number fucking 9. there was a dude that would play his guitar outside of my window at 1 am all the time

Some bits that I’ve picked up:

There’s a general rule of college that if you were sitting in that seat for over two weeks, that is your seat. Not many if any professors have seating arrangements but switching seats will fuck everyone up.

Get there early and stay late. As soon as you get home you will not want to do shit. Stay on campus and do some homework while you’re in the environment.

SIT UP FRONT. The best way to start understanding something is to listen to someone talk about it and you can’t do that from the back of the class trying to listen over everyone whispering to each other. LISTENING WILL MAKE HOMEWORK SO MUCH EASIER. 

Be childish, but be respectful. Have a massive snowball fight across campus, but don’t aim for anyone not taking part. 

SHUT THE FUCK UP IN THE LIBRARY. Some people work there, some people sleep there. It is a quiet space. 

Don’t be afraid to talk to professors. They are not there to flunk you. They would rather you pass than not.

IF YOU NEED TUTORING GET TUTORING DON’T WAIT UNTIL YOU’VE DUG YOURSELF INTO YOUR GRAVE.

Get involved. It will help you make friends, give you new skills to learn, and even help you get a leg up in the work place if you know the right people.

I will add to this as a GTA:

   Take time for yourself—buy a planner, figure out when your best study hours are, figure out WHERE you study best, and figure out how much time you need to complete an assignment—AND THEN make sure to pencil in an hour for video games, some time to watch a TV show, or time to just lay on your floor and blow bubbles. Whatever you like. Don’t forget about YOU.

  SLEEP. EAT. DRINK WATER. Don’t die. Caffeine =/= sleep. I cannot emphasize that this much. 

    AND MOST IMPORTANTLY:

  COMMUNICATE WITH YOUR INSTRUCTORS! If you’re sick, shoot an e-mail and say “Hey, I’m sick today. Can I set up a time to talk to you about what I missed?” If you’ve got a good opportunity (scholarships, to go to another country, to check out a cool lecture, etc.) let your prof know ahead of time. If you just need time to work on projects, all it takes is an e-mail. We understand. I gave a student a free skip day because he e-mailed me and said “Hey, look, I have two massive tests and a project due and I need the time to study.” And THAT IS OKAY.

   However, sometimes you just need a personal day, and you know what, when you wake up and getting out of bed seems like the worst idea ever….just turn off your alarm and get that sleep.

thank you ^

(Source: chatoyant-coyote, via academicbabe)

Anonymous said: how do you suggest we thoroughly research schools?

northeastcollegiate:

Not sure if this is referring to the general process of finding schools or researching the school once you know of it. This is written for the latter.

I think it really helps to think about what you want in a college before going to research them. Make a nice long list what your ideal college would have so you have some specific things to look out for. But it’s good to be open-minded to exploring around too!

From The College (often the school website, but also from word of mouth, other websites, etc) - “The Facts”

  • Look in academics - What possible majors are there? What do they offer to your major - the specific professors, programs, opportunities, etc?
  • Look in student life - flip through the list of extracurricular activities and see if there’s anything there of interest to you. What clubs do I want to join? What clubs interest me? Does it seem like freshmen are involved? What is the residential life like?
  • Look at the food! - What do they serve on a typical day? What kind of meal plans are there?
  • Look at admissions/financial aid - What kind of school is this for me (reach, match, safety?) What are the requirements? Is this school need-blind? 
  • Look at the location - What is nearby? Think about what you’d want in your school and how that location might be important. 
  • Other things to ask/look for - Advising system, traditions, biggest events.
  • Some colleges have virtual online tours too.

Student Input! - “The Vibe”

  • The College’s Youtube, Twitter, Tumblr, Facebook, Blogs - look at videos, tweets, posts, pictures of what the college is like. Look at the school in a less formal way - what students are saying. Explore a little.
  • Things to look for: traditions, biggest events on campus, weather, transportation, freshmen-specific opportunities, study abroad, pictures of dorms, athletic facilities (what is available to you?), partnerships with nearby colleges, libraries, etc.
  • It might help to google “Why college X?” Sometimes it’s great to hear why students did or did not pick a specific school. I used CC for this sometimes too - just be careful and mindful of who/where the info is coming from.
  • Reach out to current students/alumni - talk to alums from your school who went there, send emails to current students (usually you can find some email addresses on the college website), send Tumblr messages to current/incoming students. Ask them what they think of the school, why they picked it, what they’re involved in, pros/cons, etc.
  • Visit the school! - Take a tour, talk to current students, stay overnight, eat a meal there, watch some performances, sit in on a class.

Remember that…

  • A lot of colleges seem really similar at the outset, so you have to dig deeper to find things that really make each college “distinct” - something that most students struggle with at the beginning of their search.
  • Some representations of a college are more accurate than others.
  • What someone else emphasizes as important might not be that way too you.
  • Before making any assumptions, find out for yourself if stereotypes are true.

Hopes this helps a a bit. Good luck!

Tags: colleges

isolemnlysweartostudy:

For people who are looking for free ways to study for the SAT, this is an awesome resource (holla at this being one of the last years these sites are relevant!). 

(via academicbabe)

Tags: SAT test prep

run-rhianna-run:

Welcome to the next edition of my Student Survival Guide!

I’m glued to my phone. I LOVE new apps and I’m constantly downloading new ones (free ones, I might add) to see which are my faves

So here’s my selection of apps that I think you students (or people on a budget, or people who just love apps) need! There are WAY more apps that I love on my best apps for students page :)

Disclaimer: I’m from the UK so I’m going to be posting apps that I’ve used and loved. If they don’t work/aren’t available in other countries I’m super sorry. These are all links to the Apple iTunes Store as well, but most of them are also available on Android.

Health and fitness:

  • 5k Runner: 0 to 5k run training pro (£1.99) Now I’m sorry to start off the article with a paid app, but it’s just SO good. And it means that you don’t need a gym membership or a treadmill! I’m using it currently and I couldn’t recommend it enough!
  • Nike+ Running (Free) I love this app, and the fact that it’s free is even better! I use it alongside 5k Runner (above) and use it to track my progress. I do need to get into the habit of using it more, though…
  • PumpUp (Free) I am still yet to use this app properly and regularly but it’s amazing! You can enter in where you are (home or gym), what area of the body you want to target, what props you have access to (weights, skipping rope, only you and your body etc) and a bunch of other stuff and it tailor makes a workout for you to follow! AND it’s got a fitness community on there for motivation and just to chat to! A+ seriously
  • Calm - Meditate, Sleep, Relax (Free) I used to use the app Headspace, and I admitedly did prefer it. But when I found out you only get the first 10 days free and after that it’s a monthly supscription I deleted it out of principle. Calm comes in a very close second and I still do love it! Especially seeing as it’s free!
  • SAM (Self-help for Anxiety Management) (Free) If you have anxiety like me, this app is brilliant. It really helps you keep track of everything and manage your anxiety well. MindShift is also a good, also free app for this!

Food

  • BBC Good Food (Free) I love this website and I love this app. It has SO MANY recipes on it, it’s in UK measurements (FINALLY!! I find it so hard to find recipe apps that don’t measure everything in cups) and you can search by a bunch of different catagories! Healthy recipes included!! You can save recipes to your favourites as well which is handy! It ALSO has cooking tips and tools, so if you’re not a great cook it doesn’t matter!
  • Can I Eat It? UK (£1.99) Okay so this is another paid app but oh my jesus it’s amazing. Ever wondered whether something is vegan/fairtrade/low sugar/organic or a bunch of other things but can’t be bothered/struggle to find out through the label? THIS APP IS FOR YOU! You just scan the barcode and it tells you EVERYTHING you need to know about the food. It also now has a section for drinks as well! There’s an American version of this as well!
  • mySuperList (Free) This is an app from the website MySupermarket which I used ALL the time at uni. You put in your shop and it tells you which supermarket the shop would be cheapest at, if any items you choose have a cheaper alternative, then delivers it to your door! So now you can do all this from your app! It’s seriously amazing for saving money on your food shop.

Money and Finance

  • RedLaser (Free) This app is great. You scan something in using the barcode scanner and it will tell you the price of the item and if you can get it cheaper anywhere else!
  • Money Dashboard (Free) Helpful if, like me, you sometimes lose track of your spending. You hook it up to your bank account (totally securely) and it keeps track of your spends and catagorises them so you know what you can cut down on buying.

Organasation and Productivity

  • Evernote (Free) If you haven’t heard of this already I’d be surprised. Compile notes, photos, anything you want and have access to them from all your devices. I use it all the time!
  • Wunderlist (Free) Similar to Evernote except purely for lists. I actually use this one more than Evernote because it’s just so handy to be able to access any lists I make from my iPhone, iPad AND computer.
  • IFTTT (Free) This app is revolutionary. It basically hooks up your device with tonnes of different apps and services and does stuff for you! For example, my phone now notifies me if it’s forecast to rain tomorrow and my Instagram photos automatically upload to Twitter as photos, not links! I love it.

Deals and Offers

  • Student Beans ID (Free) Student beans has a website as well and it’s amazing. Articles, offers, freebies, job listings, EVERYTHING a student could ever need. I’m so happy they got an app!
  • UNiDAYS (Free) Want to know where you can get student discount? Get this app! You get a ton of exclusive student discounts through it as well!

Miscellaneous

  • TED (Free) Stream/Download unlimited TED talks! I’m on this app all the time.
  • Buzzfeed (Free) I really don’t need to explain Buzzfeed to you, do I? Basically, you need it. But be careful, it’s easy to waste hours reading the articles!
  • Flipboard (Free) I love this app. It’s beautiful to look at and it makes saving and reading articles so easy! Feedly is also a great one for this.
  • Pocket (Free) I only recently discovered Pocket and I love it. You can save ANYTHING you read on the internet to Pocket and read it later, really handy for any essay/dissertation research articles!

If you have ANY other great apps for students or if you know any alternatives for other countries then reblog with the link!

Part of my Student Survival Guide.

[image source]

(via academicbabe)

Tags: apps long post